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ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT FARM LANDS

corn.

97.-Q. A man whom I have known since

Here values are somewhat steadier, boyhood is selling land in Florida, well located but diversified farming and improved methods on the Caloosahatchee River, not far from Fort should increase the worth of farms even here. Myers, for $46.50 an acre. Two other friends Then there is a section along the Mississippi have bought and are already down there de- River which, when reclaimed, is well adapted veloping their land. I am thinking of buying to rice-growing. Land here increases greatly ten acres, having grape fruit trees set out, and in value when drained, but the operation is going down to attend to them for a few months ordinarily extensive and costly. every winter when they reach a bearing age. What do you advise?

100.-Q. I have considered going into comA. To repeat our invariable advice, we

mercial bulb and flower growing in either lower would not buy land anywhere from a best Delaware, Maryland, or Virginia. What is friend, a brother, or anyone else until we

your opinion of the location and of the opportuhad seen it. The land may be excellent and

nities in that line? its highest commendation is the satisfaction of men already there; but how do you know

A. Openings can often be found near large that you will like the country and the work

villages, towns, and cities for the sale of cut and be able to market crops at a profit?

flowers and plants of both outdoor and green

house culture. The localities you mention Your plan of giving only a few months' attention every year is wholly impracticable unless

would, of course, give you the benefit of a you put the place in the hands of some one else lengthened season and less expensive land than — and if you do that you are not really farming eastern bulb growing section is around Peters

places near northern centres. The only large at all.

burg, Va. You might, however, find other 98.-Q. Kindly tell me how to obtain satisfy the rather fastidious requirements of

locations where soil and climatic conditions a guide or instructions for judging and buying land for agricultural purposes. Anything that the industry. These are, briefly, a plentiful can be used by an inexperienced land buyer supply of water, within six or eight inches of the

surface, to permit rapid growth; a loose, well will do.

drained top soil; and a period of dry, warm A. The only safe guide in buying land, as

weather at the end of the growing season, to in buying horses intelligently, is experience. The best written advice we know of is contained permit the ripening and to prevent the rotting

of the bulbs. in Volume 1 of L. H. Bailey's "Cyclopedia of American Agriculture" and in T. F. Hunt's “How to Choose a Farm," (both published by

101.-. I would like information as to the Macmillan Co.). In the “Garden and

Stanton County, Kansas — land prices, crops, Farm Almanac" for 1913, published by transportation, etc. Doubleday, Page & Co., you will find a score A. Although farm property there increasef card for farms, devised and used by the New 349 per cent. between 1900 and 1910, we hardly York State College of Agriculture, that should consider it a section of farm opportunities. be useful to you.

At the latter time there were only 263 farms.

covering 35 per cent. of the land area, of which 99.-Q. In what part of Arkansas should only 15 per cent. was improved; the rainfall a person from the North look for good, moder- averages only 17 inches a year; dry farming is ate priced farm land that is likely to increase hard and often precarious; irrigating can be in value?

done only from a partially investigated underA. It depends first on the type of farming flow supply; and transportation facilities are to be pursued. On the rolling Ozark country extremely poor, no railroad lines running into of the northwestern part of the state, general the county. The total value of crops in farming, fruit-growing, and stock-raising are 1910 was $60,240, 9,400 acres of hay most profitable. As the land is cleared and and forage, 2,643 acres of broom corn, and the country settled, values should rise con- 2,250 acres of kaffir corr comprising the chief siderably. Farther south and east, the rich, items. The land averages about $7 an acte more level soils produce abundant cotton and in price.

ARTHUR W. PAGE, EDITOR

CONTENTS FOR SEPTEMBER, 1913

Mr. Howard Elliott

Frontispiece THE MARCH OF EVENTS — AN EDITORIAL INTERPRETATION

483
Mr. John Purroy Mitchel
Mr. Charles S. Prouty

Miss Mary Emma Woolley
Mr. Wickliffe Rose
Senator Charles S. Thomas

Mr. John M. Glenn
Senator Francis G. Newlands
Mr. Frank B. Kellogg

Mr. Henry Ford
Mr. William Lea Chambers
Viscount Haldane

The Growth of American Cities
Dr. Joseph Swain

Barnacles on the Ship of State
Mexico
About Entangling Alliances
Mr. McAdoo's Helping Hand
For Good Government in New York
New Blood for the New Haven
For a Solution of the Water Power

Problem
Where There Are No States' Rights

An Undercurrent of Coöperation
An Experiment in Democracy
Taxicabs and Christianity in Peking
The Panama Exposition
New Express Rates
The Tariff Reducing Woolen Prices
A Progressive Postmaster General
The Waste of Ignorance
Kentucky's “Moonlight " Schools

508

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THE ART OF BUYING BONDS CHEAPLY
LITTLE STORIES OF ELASTIC CURRENCY James R. MERRIAM 510
A PICTURE OF MEXICO

513 WHAT ABOUT THE FILIPINOS? (Illustrated)

Carl Crow 516 AMERICAN AUTOMOBILES ABROAD (III.) R. M. CLEVELAND 529 MY ADVENTURES WITH THE SUGAR LOBBY CHARLES S. THOMAS 540 TEN MILLIONS FOR GOOD WORKS

F. M. WHITE 549 SAVING THAT MILLION A DAY

C. M. KEYS 558 A COMMERCIAL TRAVELER IN THE CABINET (Illustrated)

BURTON J. HENDRICK 564 NEW WONDERS OF PHOTOGRAPHY (Illustrated) W. N. TAFT 573 A MASTER-MISTRESS OF EDUCATION (III.) - SARAH COMSTOCK 579 MARVELS OF MODERN SURGERY

EDWARD PREBLE 588 WORKADAY WIRELESS

595 THE MARCH OF THE CITIES

598 ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT FARM LANDS

600

TERMS: $3.00 a year; single copies, 25 cents. For Foreign Postage add $1.00; Canada 60 cents.

Published monthly. Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday, Page & Company. All rights reserved. Entered at the Post Office at Garden City, N. Y., as second-class mail matter

Country Life in America The Garden Magazine - Farming 1118 Peoples GM Bldg. DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY. GARDEN CITY

Y. F.N. DOUBLEDAY, President H. S. HOUSTON, Vice-President S. A. EVERITT, Treas. RUSSELL DOUBLEDAY, Sec'y

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MR. HOWARD ELLIOTT

Copyright by Marceau, New York

NEW

THE

SELECTION TO

WHOSE

HEAD OF THE NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN &
SUCCEED MR. CHARLES

HARTFORD RAILROAD SYSTEM,
OF A NEW ERA OF GOOD-WILL TOWARD THAT CORPORATION (See The March of Events

S. MELLEN

BEGINNING

SEEMS LIKELY TO BE THE

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N THE daily conversations in which There is a new era in our railroads, for we ask our neighbors how-things are they are nearly all now dominated by men of

the crops, the market, the cotton broad understanding of the responsibilities trade, as the case may be -- we are apt that the railroads have to our prosperity.

to dwell upon only temporary and It is a cleaner era in our politics than any material indications. The pessimist points that has preceded it. to possible trouble in Mexico. The optimist We are beginning to have a conscience argues from the recent report of the New about the public health, about the treatYork State Labor Bulletin showing that ment of women and children in industry. only once or twice in the last ten years has Our treatment of the criminal, of the there been as little idleness in the ranks insane, of all unfortunates, is changing of organized labor as there is this fall. from an attitude of revenge and punishAnd he points to the record of the second ment to an attitude of wise helpfulness. quarter year's net earnings of the Steel We are fast developing our school sysCorporation. They were $41,000,000, an tems to fulfil their high task of training a amount exceeded only three times in the democracy. history of the company.

The great constructive forces of the These are interesting straws blown by country are at work, but they work so the breath of prosperity to point toward quietly that we often fail to notice them. a cheerful winter. But underlying these And people who do not see these things present signs there are great constructive are prone to have undue periods of enthuforces for better business, better politics, siasm and depression. better living, and higher ideals and aspira- Because we have been busy scraping the tions than we have ever had before. barnacles off the ship of state, always a

There is a nation-wide movement to painful process for some of us,they are apt organize rural life and make the country to feel that the vessel is in serious danger. a better place to live in.

The truth is that there was never a better There is a new spirit in our cities, not only opportunity for constructive work and for industrial progress but for better city cheerfulness, and with the opportunity for government and better living conditions. these two things no one should complain.

Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday, Page & Co. All rights reserved

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