Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub
[graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

261770

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][graphic]

Measured by every standard, what could be more valuable, more concretely useful, as well as more delightfully entertaining than the Victrola?

Second only to the actual physical needs of the body is the imperative hunger of mind and spirit for their essential "foods "—music, literature, inspiration, education, comfort and laughter. The Victrola is their tireless servant, bringing to them at any place, any time, the greatest art and entertainment of the whole world.

Victrolas by the tens of thousands are in daily use by our military
forces on land and sea. In more than 25,000 public schools the Victrola
is helping to build Young America into a better citizenship. The
Victrola has taught French to our soldiers, wireless to our sailors and
aviators. In millions of homes" the Victrola is educating, refining,
uplifting our mighty democracy.

Send the Victrola to the boys in camp to cheer and inspire them!
Place it in the home for the benefit and pleasure of old and young alike.
Prize it for its value, its usefulness, its service, as well as for its unlimited,
wholesome pleasure.

There are Victors and Victrolas in great variety from $12 to $950.

Any Victor dealer will gladly demonstrate the Victrola and play any music you wish to hear.

Victor Talking Machine Co., Camden, N. J., U. S. A.

Victrola VI

Mahogany or oak

[graphic][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors]
[merged small][subsumed][graphic][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[graphic]

HoW to Write, Wlurt to Write, and Where to sell.

CuHiVare your mind. D<?\'elop vour literary gifts.Master ike arrof sclf"-e?Cpresaion.M(ike your spare time profitable. Turn your ideas into dollars.

Courses in Short-Story Writing, Versification. Journalism, Play-Writing, Photoplay Writing, etc.. taught personBr. EsenWein. ally by Dr. J. Berg Esenwein. fur many years editor of Lippincott's Magazine, and a staff of literary* experts. Constructive criticism. Frank, honest, helpful advice. Real teaching. One pupil hai recr". <-<! over $5,000 for •tone* and article* written mo.lljr in .pare time— "play work," he call* tL Another pupil received over $1,000 before completing her firrt court*. Another, a busy wife and mother, it averaging over $75 a week from photoplay writing alone.

There is no other institution or agency doing so much for writers, young or old. The universities recognize this, for over one hundred members of the English faculties of higher institutions are studying in our Literary Department. The editors recognize it. for they are constantly recommending our courses.

W* pcWiah Thr Writer 'a Library. W» also publish TAtj Writer'* Monthly, e*(vcuJly ■ ■: >' U for ita loll reporta of the literary cnaikrt. K.■■■■!■ ■* our iTMchin« service, we ©Her a manuscript criticiam s*rvic«.

150-page illuatrated'catalogue tree

the Horn*? Correspondence School

Dep't. 58, Springfield, Mass

i. B'w-igrsr'ignB-sq-^~'B"w«T~w~'

[graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

The Outlook

Copyright, 1919, by The Outlook Company

TABLE OF CONTENTS

VoL 121 .; .January 1, 1919

No. 1

VMS OCTBOOR IS PUBLISHBO WBERLY By THE OUTLOOK COMPANY, ■" • •

'481- FOURTH AVINUB, NSW YORK. l.HT.IK.I r. ABBOTT,

rnRSlUKNT. K. T. FtTLSIFRR, VlCB-rBBBlDBHT. FRANK C. HOTT, TRRASURBR. RRNBST H. ABBOTT, BBCRBTART. TKAVSK8 D.

C'ARUAN, ADVRRT1SUSO MANAGER. YBABLT SUBSCKlPTIOlt—

FIFTY-TWO 1S8UBS — FOUR DOLLARS IN ADYAVCB. BXTBRBD AS SBOOND-CLASS MATTKR, JULT 21, 1893. AT THB POST OFF1CS AT NSW YORK, UKDBR THB ACT OF MARCH 3. 1679

James R. Mann S

Zone Postage 5

The New War Against Child Labor 5

Shall We Sink the German Warships P.... 6

Comrades of the Mist 6

Preparing for the Peaoe Conference 6

Germany's Political Kaleidoscope 6

The New Red Cross 7

Joseph H. Twichell 7

Walter Hines Page 7

Joffre an Academician 7

To the Women of America 8

How a Small Town Planned its Soldiers'

Memorial 8

An Example Worth Following 8

Boys Talking Latin in New York City.. 8

Cartoons of the Week 9

What Scientists Think About the Classics 10

The War Zone in Art 10

The New President of Portugal 11

A South American Alsace-Lorraine?.... 11

1919 11

Have We a League of Nations? 12

The Tragi-Comedy of Genius Slain 13

The Camps of Disappointment 14

A Typical Modern 15

By Lyman Abbott

The Peace Conference at Versailles: V—

Economic and Industrial Peace 16

By Albert Bushnell Hart

Shall We Have a Free Press? 18

By Charles Kerr

The Great Insurance Adventure 20

By Theodore H. Price and Richard Spillane

Rebuilding France 23

By Harold Godwin

The Adventures of Theophile : IV—A Matter of Discipline 26

By Donal Hamilton Haines

Hands Across the Sea 28

By Beverley Nichols

Current Events Illustrated 29

Kentucky Mountain Rhymes : A Mountain

Seaman; Old Christmas Eve 33

By Ann Cobb

Weekly Outline Study of Current History 34

By J. Madison Gathany, A.M.

The New Books 34

The American Soldier 36

By St. John Ervine

Road-Making in the South 38

Improving an Important Highway 38

A Poet's Prediction of the Fall of Kaiserism 3

By the Way 40

BY SUBSCRIPTION 14.00 A YEAR. Single copies 10 cents.

For foreign subscription to countries in the Postal Union, So.56.

Address all communications to

THE OUTLOOK COMPANY

381 Fourth Avenue New York City

[merged small][graphic][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small]

A POET'S PREDICTION OF

THE FALL OF KAISERISM

The following poem, which a subscriber finds reprinted in the Toronto " Mail and Empire," was written by the well-known Scottish poet Charles Mackay in 1871 at the time when William I was proclaimed German Emperor. The fulfillment of its prophecy has been long delayed, but is now strikingly complete:

THE KAISER'S CROWN

(VERSAILLES, JANUARY 18, 1871)

The wind on the Thames blew icy breath,
The wind on the Seine blew fiery death,
The snow lay thick on tower and tree,
The streams ran black through wold and

lea; As I sat alone in London town And dreamed a dream of the Kaiser's crown.

Holy William, that conqueror dread,
Placed it himself on his hoary head,
And sat on his throne with his nobles about,
And his captains raising the wild war-
shout;
And asked himself, 'twixt a smile and a

sigh,
"Was ever a Kaiser so great as I?"

From every jewel, from every gem,

In that imperial diadem

There came a voice and a whisper clear—

I heard it, and I still can hear—

Which said," 0 Kaiser great and strong,

God's sword is double-edged and long!"

"Aye," said the emeralds, flashing green— "The fruit shall be what the seed has

been— His realm shall reap what his hosts have

sown,
Debt and misery, tear and groan,
Pang and sob, and grief and shame,
And rapine and consuming flame!"

"Aye," said the rubies, glowing red—

"There comes new life from life-blood

shed;
And though the Goth o'erride the Gaul,
Eternal justice rides o'er all.'
Might may be Right for its own short day,
But Right is Might forever and aye!"

"Aye,"8aid the diamonds, tongued with fire;
"Grief tracks the pathways of desire.
Our Kaiser, on whose head we glow,
Takes little heed of his people's woe,
Or the deep, deep thoughts in the people's

brain
That burn and throb like healing pain.

"Thinks not that Germany, joyous now, Cares naught for the crown upon his brow, But much for the Freedom—wooed, not

won—
That must be hers ere all is done,—
That gleams, and floats, and shines afar,
A glorious and approaching star I"

"Aye 1" said they all, with one accord,
"He is the Kaiser, King, and Lord;
But kings are small, the people great;
And Freedom cometh, sure, though late—
A stronger than he shall cast him down!"
This was my dream of the Kaiser's crown.

[merged small][graphic][merged small]

Sad words those—" Too Late"—for they always emphasize what might have been and should have been but was not—especially in life-insurance.

In March, 1915, a man living in Florida wrote to the Postal Like Insurance Company for insurance-information, which was promptly forwarded.

As he did not reply, other letters, with printed matter, were sent suggesting that he protect his family by. taking out a policy even though a small one. He put it off.

Finally, in October, 1918, the Company wrote him and inclosed an interesting booklet entitled: "How much insurance ought I to carry?" Then, after more than three years, an answer came—not from him but from his wife, who wrote:

Your letters and your interest in my husband's insurance appreciated. He died one week afrom pneumoniawithout insurance and leaving two children."

Like most husbands he doubtless intended to take out a policy, but like many careless ones, he put it off until too late.

It was too late to protect his family after he was dead, or even after he was sick. There was a time he could have done it quickly and at little cost, but he waited until too late.

As the cost increases with each year's advance in to insure is now, and in a company which stands for safety , service and saving—the Postal Life.

To find out how easy it is and how little it costs, just drop a line to the Company, mentioning The Outlook, giving (a) your exact age and (b) your occupation. Insurance particulars will be promptly sent you— by mail only. Address,

[graphic]

age, the time for every one

$

Postal Life Insurance Company

WN. R. MALQNE. Prtiidtni

511 Fifth Avenue

Conn of 43d St.

New York

[ocr errors]

Strong Postal Points

First: Old-line leaal.reserre ituttmnce — not fraterual or

Second: Standard policy re. trrre*. Resources, (9,000,000. Insurance in force, 140,000,000.

Third: !>«<*, dirtdindt guar

anteeit in

usual contingent

earned.

policy and the dividends as

Fourth: Slan.lanl polity in isions, approved by the Ne

[ocr errors]

York State Insurance ment.

Fifth: Operates under shirt New York State reyuirfmenii and subject to the United States postal authorities.

Sixth: Ifi'jh ineiliralKtawlnrtls in the selection of risks.

Seventh: Pal ie i/haltlf n1 lleaWt linreau provides one free medical examination each year if desired.

[ocr errors]

IF you are in the habit of buying The Outlook at a news-stand, it will be to your advantage to place a standing order with your newsdealer. The War Industries Board has requested publishers to discontinue the acceptance of unsold copies from newsdealers, and in conformity with that request The ( hitlook is now non-returnable. To prevent loss, therefore, newsdealers must limit their orders to actual sales. Buyers at news-stands may co-operate and avoid disappointment by giving their dealer a standing order for the weekly delivery of The Outlook.

THE OUTLOOK COMPANY

« PředchozíPokračovat »